Welcome to the Pollinator Project

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Scientific Name: Asclepias syriaca

Bloom Time: Round clusters of pink, mauve, and white blooms occur June through August.

Growing Conditions: Native to Ontario, zones 3-7. Plant 12-18 inches apart in part shade to full sun. Dry to medium well-drained soil, pH ranging 4.8-7.2. Hardy plants that tolerate poor conditions. Grows 2-4 feet tall. Perennializes by rhizomatous roots and seed pods.

Description: Common Milkweed is crucial for the survival of Monarch Butterflies as it is the only host plant for the species. It offers the Monarchs a unique protection as emerging caterpillars feed exclusively on the leaves, building a level of toxicity that is unappetizing to predators. Milkweed also attracts a wide diversity of other pollinators, supporting butterflies, moths, bees, and hummingbirds with its rich pollen and nectar supply.

Beneficial for: Monarch Butterflies, Milkweed Tussock Moths, Carpenter Bees, Bumblebees, Leafcutter Bees, Hoverflies, Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds, and other species of butterflies and moths!

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Scientific Name: Rudbeckia hirta

Bloom Time: Yellow buds will begin appearing in late summer to early autumn.

Growing Conditions: Native to Ontario, zones 3-7. Plant 12-18 inches apart in full sun to light shade. Black Eyed Susans are a mycorrhizal species that does best in well-drained soil. The taproot can go as deep as 6′. Hardy plants that can tolerate drought conditions. Will require more watering during the blooming season. Faded or necrotic leaves need to be removed to encourage growth to live areas.

Description: The dark center of the Black Eyed Susan holds 250 to 500 individual flowers. Each one of these individuals provides a shallow cup or nectar to pollinators. The shallow cups attract small wasps and flies, which benefit the flower with pest protection because they are predators of pest insects. The fruiting heads also provide seed for birds over the winter.

Indigenous Teachings: Some Indigenous communities referred to this flower as the “Deer’s Eye Daisy” due to its large brown center. First Nations people used it as a remedy for colds, flus, infections and swelling. The Ojibwa tribe even used its roots to create an infusion to treat parasitic worms. snakebites and earache.

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Scientific Name: Fragaria virginiana

Bloom Time: Round clusters of pink, mauve, and white blooms occur June through August.

Growing Conditions: Native to Ontario, zones 3-7. Plant 12-18 inches apart in part shade to full sun. Dry to medium well-drained soil, pH ranging 4.8-7.2. Hardy plants that tolerate poor conditions. Grows 2-4 feet tall. Perennializes by rhizomatous roots and seed pods.

Description: Common Milkweed is crucial for the survival of Monarch Butterflies as it is the only host plant for the species. It offers the Monarchs a unique protection as emerging caterpillars feed exclusively on the leaves, building a level of toxicity that is unappetizing to predators. Milkweed also attracts a wide diversity of other pollinators, supporting butterflies, moths, bees, and hummingbirds with its rich pollen and nectar supply.

Beneficial for: Monarch Butterflies, Milkweed Tussock Moths, Carpenter Bees, Bumblebees, Leafcutter Bees, Hoverflies, Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds, and other species of butterflies and moths!

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Scientific Name: Achillea

Bloom Time: Round clusters of pink, mauve, and white blooms occur June through August.

Growing Conditions: Native to Ontario, zones 3-7. Plant 12-18 inches apart in part shade to full sun. Dry to medium well-drained soil, pH ranging 4.8-7.2. Hardy plants that tolerate poor conditions. Grows 2-4 feet tall. Perennializes by rhizomatous roots and seed pods.

Description: Common Milkweed is crucial for the survival of Monarch Butterflies as it is the only host plant for the species. It offers the Monarchs a unique protection as emerging caterpillars feed exclusively on the leaves, building a level of toxicity that is unappetizing to predators. Milkweed also attracts a wide diversity of other pollinators, supporting butterflies, moths, bees, and hummingbirds with its rich pollen and nectar supply.

Beneficial for: Monarch Butterflies, Milkweed Tussock Moths, Carpenter Bees, Bumblebees, Leafcutter Bees, Hoverflies, Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds, and other species of butterflies and moths!

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Scientific Name: Echinacea purpurea

Bloom Time: Round clusters of pink, mauve, and white blooms occur June through August.

Growing Conditions: Native to Ontario, zones 3-7. Plant 12-18 inches apart in part shade to full sun. Dry to medium well-drained soil, pH ranging 4.8-7.2. Hardy plants that tolerate poor conditions. Grows 2-4 feet tall. Perennializes by rhizomatous roots and seed pods.

Description: Common Milkweed is crucial for the survival of Monarch Butterflies as it is the only host plant for the species. It offers the Monarchs a unique protection as emerging caterpillars feed exclusively on the leaves, building a level of toxicity that is unappetizing to predators. Milkweed also attracts a wide diversity of other pollinators, supporting butterflies, moths, bees, and hummingbirds with its rich pollen and nectar supply.

Beneficial for: Monarch Butterflies, Milkweed Tussock Moths, Carpenter Bees, Bumblebees, Leafcutter Bees, Hoverflies, Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds, and other species of butterflies and moths!

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Scientific Name: Asciepias tuberosa

Bloom Time: Round clusters of pink, mauve, and white blooms occur June through August.

Growing Conditions: Native to Ontario, zones 3-7. Plant 12-18 inches apart in part shade to full sun. Dry to medium well-drained soil, pH ranging 4.8-7.2. Hardy plants that tolerate poor conditions. Grows 2-4 feet tall. Perennializes by rhizomatous roots and seed pods.

Description: Common Milkweed is crucial for the survival of Monarch Butterflies as it is the only host plant for the species. It offers the Monarchs a unique protection as emerging caterpillars feed exclusively on the leaves, building a level of toxicity that is unappetizing to predators. Milkweed also attracts a wide diversity of other pollinators, supporting butterflies, moths, bees, and hummingbirds with its rich pollen and nectar supply.

Beneficial for: Monarch Butterflies, Milkweed Tussock Moths, Carpenter Bees, Bumblebees, Leafcutter Bees, Hoverflies, Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds, and other species of butterflies and moths!

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Scientific Name: Aster

Bloom Time: Round clusters of pink, mauve, and white blooms occur June through August.

Growing Conditions: Native to Ontario, zones 3-7. Plant 12-18 inches apart in part shade to full sun. Dry to medium well-drained soil, pH ranging 4.8-7.2. Hardy plants that tolerate poor conditions. Grows 2-4 feet tall. Perennializes by rhizomatous roots and seed pods.

Description: Common Milkweed is crucial for the survival of Monarch Butterflies as it is the only host plant for the species. It offers the Monarchs a unique protection as emerging caterpillars feed exclusively on the leaves, building a level of toxicity that is unappetizing to predators. Milkweed also attracts a wide diversity of other pollinators, supporting butterflies, moths, bees, and hummingbirds with its rich pollen and nectar supply.

Beneficial for: Monarch Butterflies, Milkweed Tussock Moths, Carpenter Bees, Bumblebees, Leafcutter Bees, Hoverflies, Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds, and other species of butterflies and moths!

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Scientific Name: Agastache foeniculum

Bloom Time: Round clusters of pink, mauve, and white blooms occur June through August.

Growing Conditions: Native to Ontario, zones 3-7. Plant 12-18 inches apart in part shade to full sun. Dry to medium well-drained soil, pH ranging 4.8-7.2. Hardy plants that tolerate poor conditions. Grows 2-4 feet tall. Perennializes by rhizomatous roots and seed pods.

Description: Common Milkweed is crucial for the survival of Monarch Butterflies as it is the only host plant for the species. It offers the Monarchs a unique protection as emerging caterpillars feed exclusively on the leaves, building a level of toxicity that is unappetizing to predators. Milkweed also attracts a wide diversity of other pollinators, supporting butterflies, moths, bees, and hummingbirds with its rich pollen and nectar supply.

Beneficial for: Monarch Butterflies, Milkweed Tussock Moths, Carpenter Bees, Bumblebees, Leafcutter Bees, Hoverflies, Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds, and other species of butterflies and moths!